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Supporting people in their own homes workbook

Price: £19.95 £5.00
The Skills for Care common induction training standards for domicilary care workers
Author(s): Malcolm Day, Elaine Grade and Elaine Wilson
Supporting People in their Own Homes can be used for the Common Induction Standards up until June 2011, unless you are starting the course now. This workbook can also be used for underpinning knowledge for frontline workers in adult social care.


All newly appointed domiciliary care workers undergo a period of induction. This is set by the government and monitored by the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI).This must be completed within the first 12 weeks of employment and it must be based on the Skills for Care Common Induction Standards (2005) and the General Social Care Council Code of Practice (2002). 

The manual is divided into chapters based on The Skills for Care Common Induction Standards (2005) and comprises a series of simple learning activities and knowledge tests. The chapters are cross-referenced to the Level 2 NVQ in Health and Social Care.

The pack also includes a short guidelines for managers outlining how they can best support the induction process. An extended version of the guidance for managers is available on a separate CD-ROM.



ISBN: 9781841962351
Publisher: Pavilion Publishing and Media
Publication: 28 March 2008
Malcolm Day is registered with the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council as an adult nurse and nursing lecturer/practice educator. He is a fellow of the Institute for Learning and a fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He is the recipient of a British Council Teacher Exchange grant and a USAid/UNCF Scholarship. Malcolm has previously worked as a clinical lead in care of the elderly, and as a care home manager. He has held university lectureships in nursing, community care and care management, and has undertaken commissioned research for the UK Department of Health and the Government of Canada. Malcolm has worked extensively in Canada and South Africa as a visiting lecturer in recognition of prior learning (RPL). He is currently a lecturer in adult nursing and an RPL advisor at the University of Nottingham.