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Crossing Frontiers

International developments in the treatment of drug dependence

Price: £10.00 £1.00
This book provides an interesting insight into various international approaches to drug and alcohol policies and treatments.
Author(s): Alex Stevens

Crossing Frontiers encourages readers to think about different international approaches to the treatment of drug users to inform their own understanding (and application) of practice in the UK. The text encourages providing a range of services, including newer approaches, which respond to the needs of users as unique individuals, empowering and supporting them to 'break the barriers' created by their drug use thus improving their lives.

Professionals within the social care sector are required to undertake Continuous Professional Development (CPD) by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Those who use this resource will be able to gain CPD points.

Academics, researchers, drug and alcohol teams, the police, social workers, youth offending/justice teams, NHS, prison workers, trainers, education services and frontline staff.
ISBN: 9781841962177
Publisher: Pavilion Publishing and Media
Publication: 18 April 2008
Content: The chapters include:
- Introduction: crossing frontiers in drug treatment
- Multisystemic therapy with substance using adolescents: a synthesis of the research
- Effective services for alcohol and drug abusing youth: perspectives from Sweden
- Heroin-assisted treatment in Europe: a safe and effective approach
- Drug consumption rooms: between evidence and opinion
- Establishing North America's first safer injection facility: lessons from the Vancouver experience
- Quasi-compulsory treatment in the Netherlands: promising theory, problems in practice
- Quasi-compulsory treatment in Europe: an evidence-based response to drug-related crime?
- Involved, represented, or ignored: the place of user involvement in British drug treatment.